Tuesday, August 11, 2015

Taka Update August 11, 2015

Taka Update August  11, 2015
Fish delivery and more
I had really good tuna last week. And I will get big eye tuna today. We will see it.
Uni is not available so far. CA? No idea, Peru? No idea. Japan? Sure on Thursday.
Live scallop is available but limited supply.
Japanese fish Omakase? I skipped it, was not great last 2-3 supplies.
Walu, Kanpachi and King Salmon are coming this afternoon or tomorrow.
Not much fish from Tokyo Fish market next week because of a big Holiday there.

Breast-Feeding May Have Dental Benefits, Study Suggests
The more babies breast-feed, the less likely it is that they will develop any kind of misalignment in their teeth later on, a new study shows.
But pacifiers can negate some of that potential benefit, even if the children are breast-feeding, the Australian researchers said.
"While most benefits of breast-feeding can be attributed to the breast-milk, this study highlights one of the ways that the actual act of breast-feeding imparts its own benefits," said Dr. Joanna Pierro, a pediatric chief resident at Staten Island University Hospital in New York City.
"While it is well established that exclusively breast-fed babies are at a decreased risk of dental malocclusion [misalignment], this study revealed the differences between those exclusively breast-fed versus those who are predominantly breast-fed," said Pierro, who was not involved in the study.
"Since many breast-fed babies today are partially fed breast-milk from a bottle, this research reveals how this difference affects the oral cavity," she added.
The researchers, led by Karen Peres at the University of Adelaide in Australia, tracked just over 1,300 children for five years, including how much they breast-fed at 3 months, 1 year and 2 years old. The study authors also asked how often the children used a pacifier, if at all, when the kids were 3 months, 1 year, 2 and 4. About 40 percent of the children used a pacifier daily for four years. When the children were 5, the researchers determined which of them had various types of misaligned teeth or jaw conditions, including open bite, crossbite, overbite or a moderate to severe misalignment.
The risk of overbite was one-third lower for those who exclusively breast-fed for three to six months compared to those who didn't, the findings showed. If they breast-fed at least six months or more, the risk of overbite dropped by 44 percent.
Similarly, children who exclusively breast-fed for three months to six months were 41 percent less likely to have moderate to severe misalignment of the teeth. Breast-feeding six months or longer reduced their risk by 72 percent.
The findings were published online June 15 in the journal Pediatrics.

Vegetarians who eat fish have lower cancer risk: Study
Most people have heard by now that increased consumption of meat can be a major risk factor for cancer development - especially when it comes to cancer of the colon. And despite loud protests by the meat industry itself, evidence continues to mount that there is indeed a link between a diet high in meat and the onset of this disease. And not all meats are created equal - red meats such as beef and pork constitute the highest risk. Vegetarians are quick to point out that, apart from environmental or ethical issues, this health risk is yet another good reason to follow a plant-based diet. However, it appears that matters are not quite so simple as that. While recent research indicates that a vegetarian diet does in fact lower the risk of colon cancer, it appears that the risk is reduced even more significantly if that diet includes the consumption of fish.

This latest study on the relationship between diet and colon cancer was recently published the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). Some of the results were not surprising and confirmed the findings of other studies in regards to the relationship between cancer and meet consumption: Vegetarians have a 22 percent lower risk of all forms of colorectal cancer than non-vegetarians, a 19 percent lower risk for colon cancer development and a whopping 29 percent lower risk of developing cancer of the rectum.

The first part of this study did not particularly come as a shock to researchers. They speculate that this kind of diet is associated with lower colorectal cancer risk for many reasons. First, vegetarians tend to consume higher levels of fruits and vegetables than other Americans: Many of these foods contain powerful antioxidants with known cancer-fighting properties. Also, vegetarian diets tend to be high in fiber and a fiber-rich diet has repeatedly been associated with better colon health and less of a chance of developing colon cancer.
What surprised scientists who were participating in this study was that, while the vegetarian diet was good for preventing colon cancer, a pesco-vegetarian diet was even better. In other words, a diet that is largely plant-based but does include regular consumption of fish was found to be the best for warding off this particular form of cancer.

Taken by numbers, pesco-vegetarians had a 27 percent lower risk of developing colorectal cancer than strict vegetarians and an incredible 42 percent lower risk than those who eat meat! Scientists suspect that this difference is due to the presence of omega-3 fatty acids that fish are so rich in. These fatty acids have, in multiple studies, shown to decrease cancer risk due to their anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.



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