Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Taka Update September 10, 2014

 Taka Update September 10,  2014
Fish delivery and more
☆ I have big eye tuna but low fat. It will come again tomorrow but also low fat.
☆ Uni is also available. The quality is good and very sweet.
 Ocean Trout is coming tomorrow. NZ King Salmon is just arrived. I ordered small one to avoid breaking meat. We will see it.
 Bad news for Live scallop. Bad weather and other issues. Maybe not this week.
Closed Info
We will be closed October 5th- 12th. I am planning to fly to Japan. I need to go to Sapporo, Kobe and Hiroshima, my home town.

Tuna Club at Yahoo group
I have a trouble at Yahoo group. So, I will not use that one any more. If you cannot get this newsletter, please contact sushiandpassion@gmail.com.  Thank you.

10 superfoods for babies and toddlers
Babies and toddlers do not eat much food because their tummies are tiny. That is why it is important to feed them foods that are packed with nutrients. Superfoods are natural foods that are high in nutrients and antioxidants packed with health giving properties. They are easily digestible and keep the body and mind healthy and working great. These 10 superfoods are essential for babies' and toddlers' growing bodies:

1. Avocado
Avocados are the best first food for your baby. They are a perfect consistency and they contain an abundance of nutrients including high levels of omega-3s. You can simply slice open an avocado and feed it straight into your little one's mouth. If you would like a smoother consistency, add a little breast milk or substitute and mash.

2. Beans
Beans are super nutritious. They are very high in antioxidants containing 10 times the amount of antioxidants as oranges. They are high in fiber, which prevents your baby from becoming constipated. They are high in iron, protein and vitamin B. They should be soaked overnight before preparing to decrease cooking time.

3. Blueberries
Blueberries are super nutritious. They are higher in antioxidants than any other fresh fruit and very beneficial to your baby's brain, urinary and nervous systems as well as their heart and eyes. They are also high in fiber, and vitamins A and C.

4. Coconut
Coconuts contain medium chain fatty acids which have significant health benefits and are similar to the ones found in human breast milk. They help boost the immune system, improve digestion, and balance the blood sugar.

5. Chia seeds
Chia seeds are higher in antioxidants than blueberries and have more calcium than whole milk. They are very high in omega-3s, magnesium, fiber, iron, potassium, and protein.

6. Dark leafy greens
These leafy greens are rich in antioxidants and high in iron and folate. They are a top superfood because they contain large amounts of vitamins C, and K as well as calcium. Vitamin K and calcium are great bone-builders.

7. Eggs (cage-free/organic)
Eggs are full of high quality nutrients for your baby. They contain choline, a B-vitamin that plays an important role in the development and function of the baby's brain. Eggs are full of protein and omega-3s as well as vitamin D, folate, the antioxidant lutein and many minerals such as zinc, iron, and selenium, a great immune booster.

8. Oats
Oats are a good source of soluble and insoluble fiber and they are also rich in phytochemicals, vitamin E, zinc, iron, magnesium and selenium. Oats are a good source of protein and a great way to start the morning. Use plain oats and add your own toppings such as nuts, seeds or fruit.

9. Quinoa
Quinoa is a complete protein making it perfect for vegetarian babies, it is high in lysine, an amino acid important for tissue growth and repair. Quinoa has a good amount of fiber and is high in nutrients such as manganese, magnesium and has a very high iron content. Quinoa is a gluten-free grain and is an alternative to whole grain rice in many baby food recipes.

10. Sweet potatoes
Sweet potatoes are among the most nutritious vegetables available. They are rich in phyto-nutrients and high in vitamins A and C. They have a naturally sweet flavor and creamy texture making these vegetables appealing to babies and toddlers.





Website : takasushiatlanta.com  E-Mail sushiandpassion@gmail.com

Twiter : https://twitter.com/sushiandpassion  Reservation 404-869-2802

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Taka Update August 27, 2014

 Taka Update August 27, 2014
Fish delivery and more
☆ I have great tuna, big eye both sides. It is only 25 lbs. for ¼ but has great toro.
☆ Uni is also available. The quality is good and very sweet.
 I erased Suzuki and Ao-dai. And Stone flounder is coming.
I will not carry NZ King salmon. The reason is quality. The meat is broken all the time.
Closed Info
We just close Labor Day, Monday.

Tuna Club at Yahoo group
I have a trouble at Yahoo group. So, I will not use that one any more. If you cannot get this newsletter, please contact sushiandpassion@gmail.com.  Thank you.

The benefits of dance for senior citizens
The thought of exercise may make some people groan and sigh in anticipation. However, physical activity doesn't have to be grueling or boring. Engaging in dance is wonderful for healthy aging and keeping seniors strong while they have a ball.
A study conducted at St. Louis University used dance therapy intervention to reduce hip or knee pain and improve mobility in residents of a senior living community. Results showed a positive relationship between weekly dance classes and mobility strength. According to the lead author Jean Krampe, Ph.D., seniors have a higher risk for falls when they aren't stable on their feet.
"Doctors and nurses recognize gait speed as the sixth vital sign that can help us predict adverse outcomes for older adults," said Krampe, an assistant professor of nursing at SLU.
Study procedure
This research was published in Geriatric Nursing and involved a 12-week study of retirement community residents, half of which attended dance classes. A customized dance therapy plan, dubbed Healthy-Steps, was created for the investigation. Healthy-Steps was designed for older people with knee or hip pain. It incorporates low-impact dance moves and can be done sitting or standing up.
Most of the participants were women, with an average age of 80. They all had pain or stiffness in their knees or hips, often due to arthritis. The intervention program entailed dancing for 45-minute sessions once or twice a week. Individuals in the group who completed the dance program reported a 39 percent reduction in their need for pain medication while the other half increased pain relief medication consumption by 21 percent.
Why choose dance?
Many health organizations recommend seniors remain physically active to avoid or postpone health issues ranging from cognitive decline to cardiovascular disease. Dancing can be much more enjoyable than other aerobic exercises, but those interested may want to check with their doctor before beginning a new workout routine.
According to Livestrong.com, dance can be used as a method of physical therapy because it improves both gait and balance. Most classes don't require any experience with dance or practice between sessions. Most importantly, many community centers and retirement homes offer free or inexpensive dance classes for senior citizens. Enrolling in one of these age-specific programs ensures the moves will be more appropriate for individual strength levels. Additionally, they provide great opportunities for socialization with other seniors. 


Website : takasushiatlanta.com  E-Mail sushiandpassion@gmail.com

Twiter : https://twitter.com/sushiandpassion  Reservation 404-869-2802

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Taka Update August 13, 2014

Taka Update August 13, 2014
Fish delivery and more
☆ Big eye tuna is available. It is 45 lbs for ¼ stomach side.  This is good one.
☆ Uni is also available. The quality is good.
  King Salmon and Ocean Trout is also available.
  Japanese fish next week is not easy. It is National Holiday in Japan. We only can
      get farmed fish from there.

Closed Info
I will postpone going to Japan. I will go there in October. So I will open the business Labor Day week.

Tuna Club at Yahoo group
I have a trouble at Yahoo group. So, I will not use that one any more. If you cannot get this newsletter, please contact sushiandpassion@gmail.com.  Thank you.

Top 6 herbs and spices for losing weight
Herbs and spices have long been used to enhance the taste of foods. It is only within the past few years that researchers have discovered that these popular components of everyday life can also aid in the weight loss battle that so many people wage. Below are six of the most potent herbs and spices that have been shown to have positive effects on weight loss.
Cinnamon
In addition to boosting the metabolism - an important step in helping to lose weight as well as maintain a healthy weight - cinnamon has also been shown to be an effective regulator of blood sugar. Other benefits that have been noted in people with type 2 diabetes including a reduction in triglycerides, LDL - or bad - cholesterol and the total cholesterol levels. Additionally, the metabolism of glucose is increased by about 20 percent when cinnamon is consumed.
Turmeric
A mainstay in the cuisines of India, turmeric is the base from which a good curry is built. This yellow-orange spice contains curcumin which is one of its most studied components. Curcumin has been shown to suppress the blood vessels necessary to form fat tissue. This, in turn, may lower both weight gain and body fat.
Cumin
Useful for both energy production and digestion, cumin is also helpful for improving glycemic control when it comes to people who have type 2 diabetes. Along with its long history of medicinal uses, cumin has also been shown to provide anti-stress benefits as well as enhance memory.
Ginger
A warming spice, ginger has been shown to relax and smooth the intestinal tract. In addition, this popular spice has anti-inflammatory properties. Studies have pointed to ginger's ability to both boost the body's metabolism as well as suppress the appetite.
Dandelions
A plant in which every part is edible, dandelions are packed full of health benefits. They help to slow the digestive system which helps a person to feel fuller for a longer period of time. In addition to its antioxidant properties, dandelions also contain crystalline compounds that are bitter. These include taracerin, inulin, taraxacin and levulin, and are thought to be behind many of the plant's therapeutic benefits. Dandelions contain fiber, beta carotene and vitamin K1 as well as other vitamins and minerals.
Mustard
A member of the cruciferous family of plants that also includes Brussels sprouts, cabbage and broccoli, mustard can bump a person's metabolic rate up by 25 percent. By eating 3/5 of a teaspoon of mustard seeds on a daily basis, the body could burn 45 additional calories per hour.

The type of herbs and spices that The are purchased matters a great deal. Buying organic whenever possible helps ensure that there are no harmful chemicals intermingled with them as well as ensuring the highest quality.


Website : takasushiatlanta.com  E-Mail sushiandpassion@gmail.com

Twiter : https://twitter.com/sushiandpassion  Reservation 404-869-2802

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Taka Update July 30, 2014

 Taka Update July 30, 2014

Fish delivery and more
☆ Big eye tuna came yesterday. It was really good one. I can make Negitoro-Don.
☆ Uni is not available. But it will come tomorrow. It is Japanese Uni. California uni? Please don’t ask. I have no idea.
  King Salmon (NZ) is coming on Friday. We just received Ocean Trout from Norway.

Closed Info
I am not sure Labor Day weekend. I am waiting Citizenship ceremony. And I have to apply US passport. It takes time.

Tuna Club at Yahoo group
I have a trouble at Yahoo group. So, I will not use that one any more. If you cannot get this newsletter, please contact sushiandpassion@gmail.com.  Thank you.

Change Bad Habits Early, Save Your Heart Later
Young adults who drop their bad health habits can reduce their risk of heart disease as they age, new research suggests. "Even after people have hit adulthood with some unhealthy behaviors, it's not too late to produce a benefit for their heart if they change those behaviors," said study author Bonnie Spring, a health psychologist and professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. "Conversely, if they don't keep up their healthy lifestyle behaviors, and lose some, we will see adverse effects on their coronary arteries, which increases the risk of heart disease," Spring said. While many studies have shown that unhealthy behaviors are linked with heart problems, fewer studies have looked at whether turning around the bad habits might have a good effect, she noted. The general thinking is that people won't change, Spring added. She found that's not always true -- and that the change made a difference. "What's important here is, if you have reached adulthood and you have an unhealthy lifestyle, you are not doomed to have heart disease," Spring said. "If you make healthy changes, you can reduce your risk." Spring's team tracked the health behaviors of more than 3,500 men and women enrolled in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study. The researchers evaluated the participants when they were aged 18 to 30 and then again 20 years later, looking for changes that predict heart disease, such as calcification in the blood vessels. The investigators looked at five healthy habits: not being overweight; being a nonsmoker; being physical active; having a low intake of alcohol; and having a healthy diet (defined as being low in fat and high in calcium, fiber and potassium). At the study's start, less than 10 percent of the young men and women reported all five healthy habits. Over time, 25 percent of the men and women made healthy lifestyle changes. About 35 percent stayed the same in terms of health habits, and 40 percent had fewer healthy habits over time. The more healthy habits that were added, the lower the risk of heart disease, the researchers found. "We can't claim cause-and-effect," Spring said, because the study only found an association between the two. However, the more healthy habits that were added, the lower the risk of finding the early signs of heart problems, she explained. The more that were discarded, the higher the risk. For instance, those who kept the same habits over the 20 years had nearly a 20 percent risk of having the early signs of heart disease by year 20. Those who discarded three or four healthy behaviors had a 32 percent risk of having the early heart disease signs. And those who added three or four healthy habits reduced the risk to just 5 percent. What to do first? The two habits that had the most effect, Spring said, were keeping a healthy weight and not smoking. Those two habits might have shown the greatest effect simply because they are easier to measure, Spring said. Even so, she suggested those two habits are a good place to start. The study is published in the July 1 issue of the journal Circulation and was funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. One expert noted the study shows that lifestyle choices made early in adulthood may make all the difference. "This new study provides new insight into how lifestyle changes from ages 18 to 30 play out over the next 20 years," said Dr. Gregg Fonarow, professor of cardiovascular medicine and science at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles. While much research has shown how unhealthy habits add to the risk of heart problems, Fonarow said, "it has not been well studied to determine how changes in lifestyle in early adulthood impact subsequent development of atherosclerosis [hardening of the arteries] and cardiovascular risk." The findings, he said, "suggest it is never too early to adopt a healthy lifestyle but that even those who start off on the wrong path can substantially turn their cardiovascular risk around by making favorable lifestyle choices in early adulthood."

Website : takasushiatlanta.com  E-Mail sushiandpassion@gmail.com

Twiter : https://twitter.com/sushiandpassion  Reservation 404-869-2802

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Taka Update July 23, 2014

 Taka Update July 23, 2014

Fish delivery and more
☆ Big eye tuna came yesterday. It was low fat tuna but could wait to see a couple of days. The price was high.
☆ Uni is available. It’s funny. People ask about uni when we don’t have it.  And people don’t ask when we have it.
☆ Both King Salmon (NZ) and Ocean Trout (Norway) are not available this weekend. Live scallop is also not available. But it might come tomorrow.


Closed Info
I am thinking to close Labor Day week. I will go back to Japan, maybe.  But I might postpone in October.


Tuna Club at Yahoo group
I have a trouble at Yahoo group. So, I will not use that one any more. If you cannot get this newsletter, please contact sushiandpassion@gmail.com.  Thank you.


'Tokyo should no longer be inhabited,' Japanese doctor warns residents regarding radiation

Just read : http://www.naturalnews.com/046112_radiation_Fukushima_Tokyo.html#ixzz38IElpW4m
If I live in Tokyo, I move to somewhere in west of Japan. But many people cannot do it.


Lower Birth Weight, Less Breastfeeding Linked to Adult Inflammation and Disease
Individuals born at lower birth weights as well as those breastfed less than three months or not at all are more likely as young adults to have higher levels of chronic inflammation that contributes to cardiovascular disease, according to a new Northwestern University study. 
Based on data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, Northwestern researchers evaluated how levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), a key biomarker of inflammation, linked back to birth weight and breastfeeding duration for nearly 7,000 24- to 32-year-olds.  
The research not only showed both lower birth weights and shorter duration of breastfeeding predicted higher CRP levels in young adults, and thus higher disease risk. The research also found dramatic racial, ethnic and education disparities. More educated mothers were more likely to breastfeed and to give birth to larger babies, as were whites and Hispanics. 
The data points to the importance of promoting better birth outcomes and increased duration of breastfeeding to affect public health among adults. Such awareness could make a difference in eroding the intractable social disparities in adult health outcomes associated with inflammation, according to the study.  
“The findings about breastfeeding and birth weight are particularly illuminating,” said Thomas McDade, professor of anthropology in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences and faculty fellow, Institute for Policy Research, at Northwestern and lead author of the study. 
 “The rates for many adult diseases completely mirror rates of low birth weight and low breastfeeding uptake and duration,” he said.
McDade also is the director of the Laboratory for Human Biology Research and of Cells to Society (C2S): The Center on Social Disparities and Health, which is part of Northwestern’s Institute for Policy Research. 
Breastfeeding is known to provide nutritional and immunological support to infants following delivery and affects immune development and metabolic processes related to obesity -- two potential avenues of influence on adult CRP production.
“This research helps us understand and appreciate the importance of breast feeding, especially for low-weight infants,” said Alan Guttmacher, M.D., director of the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. “The results suggest that breast feeding may reduce a major risk factor for heart disease, well into adulthood.”
An innovation of the study is the use of sibling comparison models, which control for many of the factors that may bias previous estimates of the impact of birth weight and breastfeeding on adult health outcomes. In these models, sibling differences in birth weight and sibling differences in breastfeeding duration are used to predict differences in adult CRP across siblings.
Each pound of additional birth weight predicted a CRP concentration that was 5 percent lower. Three to 12 months of breastfeeding predicted CRP levels that were 20 to 30 percent lower compared with individuals who were not breastfed. 
In fact, breastfeeding had the same or greater effect as drug therapies that reduce CRP in young adults, as measured in previous clinical studies. 
“The research makes a strong case about the need to invest in interventions early in life to reverse the relatively intractable social disparities we see in adult health in the United States,” McDade said. 
The study, “Long-term effects of birth weight and breastfeeding duration on inflammation in early adulthood,” will be published online April 23 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 


Friday, July 11, 2014

Taka Update July 11, 2014

 Taka Update July 11, 2014

Fish delivery and more
☆ I have low fat Big eye tuna for this weekend.
☆ Uni is not available. It will come next Thursday from Japan. This is the only route to get uni right now.
☆ I have King Salmon (NZ) and Ocean Trout (Norway) are not available this weekend.

 Closed Info
☆ I am thinking to close Labor Day week. I will go back to Japan, maybe.  

 Fruits and vegetables linked to stroke prevention
Eating more fruits and vegetables may reduce stroke risk by almost a third, according to a fresh look at recent evidence.

The results support existing recommendations from organizations like the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which already call for a diet rich in fresh greens.
“The findings are consistent with the current knowledge that increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables should be encouraged to prevent stroke,” Dr. Yan Qu said in an email.

Qu, of the Qingdao Municipal Hospital and the Medical College of Qingdao University in Qingdao, China, led the analysis.
A stroke occurs when bloodflow to part of the brain is blocked by a clot or a burst blood vessel. Without emergency care, a stroke can lead to severe brain damage or death.

Stroke remains the fourth leading cause of death in the U.S., according to the CDC.
Several studies have looked at the influence of diet on stroke risk. Some have tied eating lots of fruits and vegetables to lowered risk; others have found no link at all.

The effect could be indirect, and eating fruits and vegetables may benefit overall health by reducing blood pressure, cholesterol, weight and other stroke risk factors, Qu said. It’s also possible that specific nutrients in the foods may reduce stroke risk, he said.
To get a better understanding of the relationship between stroke risk and plants in the diet, the researchers searched for reports from recent decades that tracked the eating habits and health of men and women around the world.

Twenty studies examining a total of 16,981 strokes among 760,629 participants were included in the analysis.
Overall, the people who ate the most fruits and vegetables were 21 percent less likely to have a stroke, compared to people who ate the lowest amounts, the researchers found.

The benefits rose along with the amounts of produce consumed. Stroke risk fell by 32 percent for every 200 grams (g) per day of fruit people ate, and 11 percent with every 200 g of vegetables.
The researchers found that citrus fruits, leafy vegetables and apples and pears were the specific types of greenery linked to reduced stroke risk.

“The effect of other types of fruit and vegetables on stroke risk still needs to be confirmed,” Qu said.
The researchers cannot say for certain that eating fruits and vegetables caused fewer strokes among the participants. They point out that there could be other factors that influence the results; for example, people who eat more fruits and vegetables may lead generally healthier lives.

"It doesn’t surprise me too much in that it seems to confirm what a lot of other studies have shown," Dr. David A. Miller said.
Miller, who was not involved in the new study, directs the Advanced Primary Stroke Center at Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida.

"We still don’t know if there is anything inherent in the fruits and vegetables or whether it’s their effect on blood pressure," he said. "It’s a chicken and egg type of thing."
Miller also pointed out that the researchers also found people who controlled their other risk factors - such as weight, smoking and overall diet - had the lowest risk of stroke.

"Eating fruits and vegetables is helpful, but it’s not the only thing," he said.


Website : takasushiatlanta.com  E-Mail sushiandpassion@gmail.com


Twiter : https://twitter.com/sushiandpassion  Reservation 404-869-2802

Friday, June 27, 2014

Taka Update June 27, 2014

 Taka Update June 27, 2014

Fish delivery and more
☆ I have very good tuna this week. But it is almost gone. It is well mature now.
☆ Uni is sold out. It will come back next week. But the quality is getting bad.
☆ I have King Salmon (NZ)  is available. Ocean Trout is coming next week.

Closed Info
☆ July 4th is Friday. We will be closed. But we will be opened next day. I decided to play golf from July 4th- 6th, 3 days straight. This is my summer camp. Am I crazy? I have to work on 5th for dinner.

11 Proven Health Benefits of Chia Seeds
1. Chia Seeds Deliver a Massive Amount of Nutrients With Very Few Calories
2. Chia Seeds Are Loaded With Antioxidants
3. Almost All The Carbs in Them Are Fiber
4. Chia Seeds Are High in Quality Protein
5. Due to The High Fiber and Protein Content, Chia Seeds Should be Able to Help You Lose Weight
6. Chia Seeds Are High in Omega-3 Fatty Acids
7. Chia Seeds May Improve Certain Blood Markers, Which Should Lower The Risk of Heart Disease and Type 2 Diabetes
8. They Are High in Many Important Bone Nutrients
9. Chia Seeds Can Cause Major Improvements in Type 2 Diabetics
10. Chia Seeds Can Improve Exercise Performance as Much as a Sports Drink
11. Chia Seeds Are Easy to Incorporate Into Your Diet

Read more? http://authoritynutrition.com/11-proven-health-benefits-of-chia-seeds/